Twinkle Black Sheep E, F, G...

s33:

I came across this article while looking into how the idea of symmetry carries over into sound. Not knowing much about music theory, I reached for Twinkle, Twinkle, Little Star as a simple example of some kind of symmetry (or inversion) between the ascending first line and the descending repetition of the second line of the melody.

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In this article, I was surprised to find an author whose subject matter (and writing style) seemed very familiar to me.

…Ambience could be shown to resist the reification of space in capitalism. For like all dialectical images, ambience at once fills and overspills the ideological frame intended for it by the social structure in which it emerged. Why? Because ambience is what Jacques Lacan would call a sinthome, a metastasized kernel of inconsistent and meaningless enjoyment to which any linguistic frame would sit loose.

I have been curious about Twinkle Twinkle ever since I realized that it was the melody for three of the same kind of nursery school tunes:

If the tune for “Twinkle, Twinkle, Little Star” is a “folk” tune, it is a paradoxical one: a folk tune with a cosmopolitan reach. The traditional tune associated with “The Star” is “Ah! Vous Dirai-Je, Maman,” that appeared without words in a 1761 Paris publication, M. Bouin’s Les Amusements d’une Heure et Demy. The tune was adapted by Mozart: Twelve Variations on “Ah, vous dirai-je, maman” was published 1785 by Christoph Torricella in Aira Variée; according to Fuld, “Beethoven improvised on the theme in his second public concert in Prague in 1798.” Fuld states further that “The song came to be sung as ABCDEFG under the title “The Schoolmaster” in 1834.” A similar tune has been set to “Baa, Baa Black Sheep,” the words for which appeared in print in about 1744 in Tommy Thumb’s Pretty Song Book. The tune is also used in the German “Ist das nicht ein Schnitzelbank? [carpenter’s bench]” (593-4).4

Morton’s discussion of ‘ambient poetry’ in the context of dualism, ecology, and the politicization of gender overlap importantly with multisense realism, and I can see a promising connection in his use of ‘ambience’ and my exploration of eidetic-hypnotic phenomenology.

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The use of ink blots for Rorschach tests underscores how certain kinds of patterns lend themselves to eidetic hallucination - seeing simulacra, especially faces, seems to be a jumping off point for accessing subconscious material and loosening associations. They are images which cause us to begin to dream or create story narratives, and therefore represent a phase transition from images in public space to subjects through private time.

I am left wondering too whether this is part of what makes a song or a performance of singing a song into a lullaby. I don’t know if Twinkle is considered a lullaby, but I would say the tune augments the hypnotic quality to that which is already present in simple poems or nursery rhymes. Rhyme is verbal symmetry.

This passage is of particular interest, where he puts his finger on the same connection with ellipsis (…) that I have.

The Romantic period is often thought to be the moment during which the world became especially story-shaped, and if not entirely teleological, then playing with the notions of ends and beginnings in the ways suggested by the “to be continued […]” openness of the Romance genre.

Just as the isomorphic filling-in theory seeks a neural explanation of how our visual sense conjures up complex patterns that are not ‘really there’, I have speculated about a generalized elliptical principle of ‘transrational algebra’ which is a key feature in defining the multi-level integration of human consciousness, the underlying weave of both sanity and insanity and, as the author suggests Romanticism and imagination.

His ‘phatic’ section (32-34) is interesting as well. The term is used to describe communication which highlights what I would call the syntax layer or medium through which semiotic process occurs, so that “the actual [pragmatic] content of the message itself is designed to soothe its addressee into sleep: to perform an effect on a subject rather than contemplate an object.”

I think that investigation of this area will bring us closer to how literal realism and figurative hyper-realism are actually joined as phenomena in the universe: how we make sense, and how sense makes us.




‘Romantic natural history helps us to see how the “Nature” of Isaac Newton and Linnaeus becomes, via Wordsworth and Shelley, the “nature” of Stephen Hawking and Stephen Jay Gould’ 

‘Romantic natural history helps us to see how the “Nature” of Isaac Newton and Linnaeus becomes, via Wordsworth and Shelley, the “nature” of Stephen Hawking and Stephen Jay Gould’ 

magictransistor:

William Blake (engraved by Luigi Schiavonetti), Robert Blair’s The Grave (Cromek/Bentley), 1808.

 Northern view from the Hancock building.

 Northern view from the Hancock building.

How The Astronauts Became Known As Gods io9
art by Yuri Shwedoff.

How The Astronauts Became Known As Gods io9

art by Yuri Shwedoff.

"And let the misty mountain-winds be free
To blow against thee: and, in after years,
When these wild ecstasies shall be matured
Into a sober pleasure; when thy mind
Shall be a mansion for all lovely forms,
Thy memory be as a dwelling-place
For all sweet sounds and harmonies; oh! then,
If solitude, or fear, or pain, or grief,
Should be thy portion, with what healing thoughts
Of tender joy wilt thou remember me,
And these my exhortations! Nor, perchance—
If I should be where I no more can hear
Thy voice, nor catch from thy wild eyes these gleams
Of past existence—wilt thou then forget
That on the banks of this delightful stream
We stood together; and that I, so long
A worshipper of Nature, hither came
Unwearied in that service: rather say
With warmer love—oh! with far deeper zeal
Of holier love. Nor wilt thou then forget,
That after many wanderings, many years
Of absence, these steep woods and lofty cliffs,
And this green pastoral landscape, were to me
More dear, both for themselves and for thy sake!”
artchunks:

H. E. Figueroa 
acknowledgeandproceed:

clear sea water by TheoSia Colorful Pebbles

acknowledgeandproceed:

clear sea water by TheoSia Colorful Pebbles

blastedheath:

Wang Wuxie (Wucius Wong) (Chinese, b. 1936), Mountain Thoughts No. 6, 1981. Ink and colour on paper, framed, 63 x 63 cm.

blastedheath:

Wang Wuxie (Wucius Wong) (Chinese, b. 1936), Mountain Thoughts No. 6, 1981. Ink and colour on paper, framed, 63 x 63 cm.

Nature is no great mother who has borne us. She is our creation. It is in our brain that she quickens to life. Things are because we see them, and what we see, and how we see it, depends on the Arts that have influenced us. To look at a thing is very different from seeing a thing. One does not see anything until one sees its beauty. Then, and then only, does it come into existence. At present, people see fogs, not because there are fogs, but because poets and painters have taught them the mysterious loveliness of such effects. There may have been fogs for centuries in London. I dare say there were. But no one saw them, and so we do not know anything about them. They did not exist till Art had invented them.

mereolaudio upload